Patchwork Heart and Silver Soul

This is my slightly more artsy/intellectual blog: photography, quotes, cool vocabulary words, poetry, plants, some sj stuff, art, etc. I run a fandom blog called The Lamb is Caught in the Blackberry Patch, and I also run a happiness/recovery blog found at hopefulstarling.tumblr.com. Finally, I'm a mod for the Buffy blog Imagine BtVS.

ephemeral-elegance:

Peacock Embroidered Tea Gown, 1912

A.H. Metzner New York

via 1stdibs

girl-farts:

Less queer struggles more queer snuggles 

(via theannoyedasexual)

libutron:

Greater Sage Grouse - Centrocercus urophasianus

This elegant bird is a male of the Greater Sage Grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus (Galliformes - Phasianidae), the largest of North American grouse, which inhabits the shrublands of south-eastern Canada and western United States.

Males of this species have a grey crown, markings on the back of the neck and yellow lores (the region between the eye and bill). The upper chest is brown and buff and the middle is composed of a large white ruff concealing esophageal sacs that inflate during courtship. There is also a large black patch on the abdomen. Females have more cryptic plumage and lack the esophageal sacs that the males have.

The breeding system of the Great Sage Grouse is quite interesting. They employ leks to select mates prior to reproduction; this means that every breeding season, sexually mature individals gather at various sites. These sites are where males display to the females. The purpose of the display is to attract females and defend territories. The males whose display is most attractive to the female, will get to mate with her.

This species is classified as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Doug Dance | [TopLocality: near Worland, Wyoming, US - 2009] - [Bottom - Locality: unknown - 2009]

(via anythingavian)

so-personal:

everything personal♡

so-personal:

everything personal♡

(Source: dailyreasontobehappy, via staypositive-it-will-get-better)

babyakita:

#plants

I made an experiment

mirandaisinrecovery:

I’ve always felt like  I’m not good enough. Calling myself worthless is part of my daily routine. So I decided to burn this mindset, literally. 

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Then, I replaced worthless for all the words I think describe me… 

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YOU NEED TO TRY THIS EXPERIMENT. IT WILL REMIND YOU HOW AMAZING YOU ARE…

(via female-federal)

darlingthumbelina:

win-the-revolution-with-style:

maria-alice-121:

WHAT DO WE WANT?

PROFESSIONALLY FILMED STAGE MUSICALS!!

WHERE DO WE WANT IT?

ON NETFLIX!!

OR ON DVD

OR LITERALLY ANYWHERE THATS AVAILABLE PUBLICLY

(Source: jonathangriff, via gypsy-rose-love)

wnderlst:

Svinafellsjökull, Iceland | Maurice Lepetit

wnderlst:

Svinafellsjökull, Iceland | Maurice Lepetit
female-to-female:

i made a thing

female-to-female:

i made a thing

(via filthcore)

school dress codes

girls:

sleeves must cover shoulders, no cleavage should be shown in the slightest, shorts/skirts need to be longer than your fingertips (if its .000567 inches off you still must change)

boys:

hahaha i dont even fucking know just wear whatever

“Stories are like children. They grow in their own way.”

—   A Swiftlyy Tilting Planet, Maeline L’engle

(Source: check-your-pockets-chimney-child)

“Writers do have responsibilities—all serious writers make a continual, and painful, and developing effort, to get as close as they can to what they see as reality—the shifting complex reality of human experience. A serious writer is always doing that, not attempting to please people, or flatter them, or offend them … (M)oral books … deal with the question of how to live—what makes life not only bearable but what makes it honourable, how can people care for each other, how can we deal with hypocrisy and self-deception, how can we grow and learn and survive?”

—   Alice Munro, the 2013 recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature, in a speech to her hometown after her coming-of-age novel, Lives of Girls and Women, was banned for “moral” reasons.

(Source: booksmatter)

“At nineteen they can card you in the bars and tell you to get the fuck out, put your sorry act (and even sorrier ass) back on the street, but they can’t card you when you sit down to paint a picture, write a poem, or tell a story, by God, and if you reading this happen to be very young, don’t let your elders and supposed betters tell you any different. Sure, you’ve never been to Paris. No, you’ve never ran with the bulls at Pamplona. Yes, you’re a pissant who had no hair in your armpits until three years ago- but so what? If you don’t start out too big for your britches, how are you gonna fill ‘em when you grow up? Let it rip regardless of what anybody tells you, that’s my idea; sit down and smoke that baby up.”

—   Stephen King, “On Being Nineteen (And a Few Other Things)”

(Source: cptcasey)

“That’s what I love about reading: one tiny thing will interest you in a book, and that tiny thing will lead you to another book, and another bit there will lead you onto a third book. It’s geometrically progressive - all with no end in sight, and for no other reason than sheer enjoyment.”

—   Mary Ann Shaffer, The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

(Source: wordsnquotes.com, via wordsnquotes)